Victa Big End Bearing

Victa Big End Bearing Replacement

Installation of a big end bearing into the conrod of a 2 stroke Victa lawn mower.

Tools/Parts:

    • Hammer
    • 20mm or 3/4 Socket
    • Replacement Big End Bearing


Step 1

Remove the conrod from the engine and place it in a vice (no need to remove the piston). Place the socket inline with the old bearing and tap it with a hammer to remove the old bearing (heating the conrod may make things easier if it proves difficult).

Step 2

Heat the appropriate end of the conrod in order to make inserting the new bearing easier. Place the new bearing in position and gently tap it in place with a hammer (you may also use the socket once again).

Step 3

Finally grind the mark portions and carefully check wwith your crank pin unitl you have a snug fit.

2 Responses to “Victa Big End Bearing Replacement”

  1. Great Video nice to see you are using my favourite tool THE Hammer

  2. This is really great website – thanks for providing all the techniques and information.
    This technique had me a little edgy though – if the old bearing race was really tight, using the hammer and vice in that manner has all the potential of bending the rod especially for those people who don’t know their own strength.
    Perhaps a more forgiving method might be to place the big end over a larger socket (or a hole in a piece of wood or whatever) to support it while driving the old bearing out. The hammer doesn’t even have to be used – the small socket could push the old bearing into the larger socket in the vice.
    Replacing the bearing could also use the vice to press the new bearing into place. A thin piece of wood or similar could protect the side of the big end, and another piece could be used to protect the new bearing from the vice jaw serrations. The small socket could then be used to accurately position the bearing once nearly in position. Using the vice aligns the bearing more easily so there’s less chance of forcing it in crooked. Don’t ask me how I know these things.
    Propane torches don’t even have to be used – pouring boiling water over the big end can often get enough expansion to do a similar job. If that’s not enough, putting the bearing in the freezer (in a plastic bag to keep it dry) for a few hours can often get contraction of that part to overcome tight fits.

Leave a Reply