Testing Universal Ignition Module

Learn how to test a universal ignition module to determine whether it is in need of replacement.

Tools/Parts:



Step 1

Set the multimeter to the 20k ohms setting. Place the red and black probes at opposite ends of the ignition module.

Step 2

A reading of 4.54 kOhms indicates an as new ignition module. As the reading increases your spark’s power may decrease as an estimate resistances above 6-8K Ohms┬ámay cause failure of the spark needed to start a mower.

If resistance is infinite your module is damaged and will need to be replaced.

15 Responses to “Testing Universal Ignition Module”

  1. Hi guys,

    Your ‘Testing Universal Ignition Module’ video demonstration does not appear. Instead, the web link presents the ‘Briggs Ignition Coil Testing’ video.

    Also, in your text description above for the Testing Universal Ignition Module; is a new module supposed to indicate 4.54 Ohms or 4.54 KOhms when tested with the multimeter? You are advising that the multimeter should be set to the 20KOhm setting, so I am guessing that the reading should be 4.54 KOhm. Is this correct?

    Thanks and regards,
    Peter

  2. watching testing ignition module i noticed that the black connecter was not in com on your multimeter is it not nessecary with this test with my multimeter i was told black lead always goes to com is this ok as you have it in red

  3. what if you get a reading of 1.25??? Does that mean you have to replace it??

  4. Hi guys. Awesome videos. Really helpful. I’m having issues with my victa. Usually starts when I get out of the shed after a couple pulls but if it stalls or I turn it off I can never start it again. I basically have to leave it for a day. I’ve gone through and checked the carb, seals etc, throttle and All seems ok. When its running and it sounds like it’s about to stall if tilt it up on its back wheels it kicks in to life . But it always sounds like it’s struggling.

    Any ideas?
    Thanks

    • Hi Nick

      Is the mower blowing a lot of blue smoke? it could be that the fuel mix is a bit rich. If so the mower would rev slower than usual and seem to struggle and tipping it backwards would make it a little harder for the fuel to get into the engine possible leaning out the mix.

  5. G’day,
    I have a Victa Mustang 2 stroke mower.

    When checking the spark plug for spark in the ignition boot and grounded by touching the head – i have no spark. Plug is Champion CG8 and BRAND NEW.

    When i replace the spark plug with a LED spark plug in-line tester or a small globe – grounded on the head – I get flashes of the tester or globe indicating spark.

    I have checked the coil with a multi meter and get a reading of

    I have set the gap of the flywheel to coil to the thickness of a business card.

    I have removed the EARTH wire of the kill switch and still have no spark on the plug but still get the flashes on the tester,circuit tester or globe.

    I am about to purchase several items from your website to fix components that are broken and leaking. However i don’t think these will stop spark:

    Head gasket
    Carby plate with fuel primer
    Fuel line
    Carby needle
    Spark plug
    Spark plug boot and new screw
    High tension plug lead
    Kill switch boot and cut out sleeve

    Any help is much appreciated.

    • Hi Nathan

      It is likely that the coil is not providing enough voltage to generate a spark but provides enough to activate the LED, You may need to replace the coil, If you get back to us with the part number of the coil and the resistance reading we can suggest what the next steps should be. (You seem to have left out the reading by mistake in your previous comment)

  6. Hi,

    I have an old Victa Mustang 2 stroke mower, and I have problems getting the spark plug to spark.

    The old coil was measuring 14K+ohm, so I have replaced it with one I ordered from you guys which measures 9K+ ohms. The old ignition module measures 5.6K ohms, so still within the range that would work, as indicated in your video.

    I’ve checked all the wiring, and tested them with a screwdriver line tester (connected to the spark plug cap and earthed on the side of the engine), which lighted up when I cranked the engine. Yet, I won’t get a spark when I tested the spark plug.

    Is there a possibility that the ignition module is actually not working well enough to allow the spark plug to produce a spark or could it be another problem?

    Would greatly appreciate it if you could provide me with some advice.

    • Hi Michael

      A light with the line tester indicates that the system is working but may not be producing enough voltage to generate a spark.

      The multi-meter test of the module can give a general idea about the condition of the part but is not an exhaustive test of whether it is functioning correctly, If your coil and plug is new and your wiring is correct the next step would be to replace the module.

  7. Hi,
    Just adding further details to my previous email. It was a new spark plug that I was testing. Also, the gap between the coil and flywheel magnets has been set using a business card.

  8. Hi,
    Just want to let you know that I finally got the spark after installing the new ignition module that I ordered from you and the mower eventually started. One question though, when I measure the resistance on the new module, it actually reads 5.31K ohms, rather than the mid 4K ohms as indicated in your video. Should I be concerned that the module’s effective life could potentially be shorter considering that its high 5.31K ohms to start with?
    Thanks.

    • Hi Michael
      Great to hear that you got spark after replacing the ignition module, It does not matter that the module has a higher reading as it is not exactly the same as the OEM module, Each Variant of module or coil has a specific working range so differences between different branded parts is normal.

Leave a Reply